The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children see an orthodontist by at least age seven and sooner if something is obviously wrong before age seven. Fortunately, most young patients don't need anything more than observation while the permanent teeth are growing into place.

Many young patients have problems, which will not, or should not wait. Most orthodontic problems are inherited and cannot be totally prevented; however something can usually be done before these problems become more difficult and more expensive to manage.

It is advisable to consult with an orthodontist prior to having your dentist remove any baby teeth or permanent teeth. To ensure the best overall dental and facial development, all patients should have an orthodontic consultation sometime between the ages of four and seven.

Dr. Bock offers early examinations and observation consultations. Contact us to schedule a complimentary consultation.

Classifications of Teeth

The classification of bites is divided into three main categories: Class I, II, and III. This classification refers to the position of the first molars, and how they fit together.

Class I
Class I is a normal relationship between the upper teeth, lower teeth and jaws or balanced bite.


Class I normal



Class I crowding

 

Class I spacing
 

 

Class II
Class II is where the lower first molar is posterior (or more towards the back of the mouth) than the upper first molar. In this abnormal relationship, the upper front teeth and jaw project further forward than the lower teeth and jaw. There is a convex appearance in profile with a receding chin and lower lip. Class II problems can be due to insufficient growth of the lower jaw, an over growth of the upper jaw or a combination of the two. In many cases, Class II problems are genetically inherited and can be aggravated by environmental factors such as finger sucking. Class II problems are treated via growth redirection to bring the upper teeth, lower teeth and jaws into harmony.

 

 
Class II division 1

 
 
Class II division 2

 

 

Class III
Class III is where the lower first molar is anterior (or more towards the front of the mouth) than the upper first molar. In this abnormal relationship, the lower teeth and jaw project further forward than the upper teeth and jaws. There is a concave appearance in profile with a prominent chin. Class III problems are usually due to an overgrowth in the lower jaw, undergrowth of the upper jaw or a combination of the two. Like Class II problems, they can be genetically inherited. Class III problems are usually treated via surgical correction of one or both jaws.

 
Class III functional or dental

 
 
Class III skeletal

 

 

Orthodontic Problems

 
Overjet
Upper front teeth protrude


 
 
Deep bite
Upper front teeth cover lower front teeth too much

 
 
Underbite
Lower front teeth protrude


 
 
Open bite
Back teeth are together with space between the front teeth


 

Crowding
Upper and/or lower teeth are crowded


 

Excess Spacing
There is excess space between teeth


 

Mid-Line Misalignment
Mid-lines of upper and lower arches do not line up

 

Crossbite
Upper back teeth fit inside lower teeth

Phases of Treatment

Phase I: Treatment usually takes 12 to 18 months and is done between the ages of 7-9. A variety of appliances may be used to correct specific problems.

Maintenance / Recall Phase: During the time between the first and second phase the patient will be seen every few months per year. This is to monitor the eruption of the permanent teeth and exfoliation of primary teeth.

Phase II (if required): During the first phase of treatment Dr. Bock has no control over 16 unerupted permanent teeth. If they grow in and problems still exist, further treatment, known as Phase II, will be required. A separate fee will be quoted at that time. Treatment usually takes 12-24 months.

Full Treatment: If you decide to wait, treatment will be started when all permanent teeth have erupted. Full treatment usually takes 18-30 months. The length of treatment depends on the severity of malocclusion and orthodontic problems.

Proper Braces Care and Brushing Techniques

Brushing and flossing your teeth can be challenging when wearing braces but it is extremely important that you do both consistently and thoroughly.

 
 
 


Foods to Avoid During Treatment: Eating proper foods and minimizing sugar intake are essential during orthodontic treatment. Your braces can be damaged by eating hard, sticky, and chewy foods.

  • Hard foods : Nuts, Candy, Hard Pretzels
  • Crunchy foods : Popcorn, Ice, Chips, etc.
  • Sticky foods : Gum, Chewy Candy (Skittles, Taffy, Gummy Bears, Caramel, etc.)
  • Chewy foods : Bagels, Hard Rolls, etc.
  • Foods you have to bite into : Corn on the Cob, Apples, Carrots (cut these foods up into smaller pieces and chew on back teeth)
  • Chewing on Hard Objects (for example, pens, pencils or fingernails) can damage the braces. Damaged braces will cause treatment to take longer.

Hard Foods

 

Soft Foods

 

Tooth sensitivity.If your teeth seem especially sensitive after you brush them or when you consume certain foods or beverages, you're hardly alone: By one estimate, around 35 percent of the U.S. population experiences some degree of tooth sensitivity. While the difference between sensitivity and pain may be somewhat blurry, we can say that sensitive teeth usually produce discomfort in response to a stimulus like temperature, pressure, or even the sweetness of particular foods. What causes tooth sensitivity — and what should you do about it?

In general, tooth sensitivity results when dentin, the living tissue that makes up most of the “body” of the tooth, begins transmitting sensations to nerves deep in the tooth's inner core. The nerves relay these sensations to the brain, and they're felt as pain. To understand how this works, let's take an even closer look at your teeth.

Tooth Anatomy 101

Blowup of Dentin.

Dentin is a sturdy, calcified tissue, that can't usually be seen. It's normally covered by super-hard enamel on the visible part of the tooth (the crown), and by softer tissue called cementum on the tooth's roots (which typically lie below the gum line). The dentin itself is composed of many tiny tubules. When these tubules become exposed to the environment of the mouth, tooth sensitivity and pain may result.

There are several reasons why the dentin can become exposed. For one, the gums may recede (shrink down), revealing some of the tooth's root surfaces. This can be caused by genetic factors, periodontal disease, excessively vigorous brushing — or a combination of all three. This problem may be worsened if the tooth's roots weren't completely covered by cementum during their development, as sometimes occurs.

Another factor that may contribute to sensitivity is the erosion of tooth surfaces due to excessive acid in the diet. While acids occur naturally in the mouth, habitually drinking sodas and sports drinks can severely erode teeth — and brushing soon after you drink actually worsens the effect. That's because these acids soften the outer surfaces of the teeth, and brushing then makes it easy to wear them away. It's best to wait for an hour afterwards, to give your saliva a chance to neutralize the acid.

Tooth Decay.Tooth decay can also cause sensitivity. Decay may not only expose dentin, but can work its way down to the nerves themselves — at which point, your pain level may escalate. And sometimes, even dental work itself can cause sensitivity. Because the same tooth structures are involved, it may sometimes take a few days after a cavity is filled, for example, for a tooth to “calm down.”

Dealing With Tooth Sensitivity

What can you do about sensitive teeth? If it's a relatively minor irritation, try not to brush the affected teeth too long or hard. Make sure you're using a soft-bristled brush and the proper, gentle brushing technique. Always use a toothpaste containing fluoride, as this ingredient is proven to increase the strength of tooth enamel, which helps resist erosion. You can also try a toothpaste with ingredients designed especially for sensitive teeth, such as potassium. Studies show that these can be effective… but it may take approximately 4 – 6 weeks for you to notice the difference.

If sensitivity persists, however — or if your tooth pain becomes more intense — don't wait to get an examination to determine what's causing the problem. Once diagnosed, the most appropriate way to reduce the sensitivity will be recommended. Some treatments may include concentrated fluoride varnishes, prescription mouthrinses, or materials that are bonded to the outer surfaces of teeth. But tooth sensitivity may also be an early warning sign of other dental problems — and the sooner they're taken care of, the better off you'll be!

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